SMALL THANKS 2014

reasontobethankful.qmI have many things for which to be thankful.  I have never in my life had to worry about where my next meal was coming from or whether I would have a roof over my head.  I have never been without friends.  I have good health for somebody my age (nearly 78).  I can honestly say I have everything I really want.

But this post is not about these things.  It is about small things for which I am thankful.

I am thankful for automobiles that don’t rust out.  When I first came to Rochester, the city and county governments used to spread large amounts of road salt in the winter.  Natives and long-time residents told me it was important to get a good rust-proofing service; I, foolishly, used an inexpensive service instead, to my regret.  Road salt is less of a problem now than it was then, but the plastic body of my Saturn doesn’t rust.

I am thankful for automobiles that always start in the winter.  I can remember when this was a big issue.  I would run my car in neutral when I got home, and before I tried to start the car, in hope of recharging the battery enough to get a good start.  Now, with alternators as standard equipment, that recharging takes care of itself.  I am thankful for automobiles that get good traction on ice-covered and snow-covered streets, for right-side rear view mirrors and for rear-window defrosters.  I am thankful for idiot bells that let me know when I am getting out of the car with my lights still on or my key still in the ignition; this idiot needs the reminder.

I am thankful for ballpoint pens that don’t leak over my shirts when I accidentally put them in the washer.

I am thankful the Barnes & Noble bookstore provides chairs so I can sit and read.

I am thankful for painless dentistry.  As a boy, I once had a tooth extracted without anesthetic.  The dentist used what looked like a pair of pliers.  He pulled and pulled and pulled, then had to stop and catch his breath before going back and finally getting it out.

I am thankful for plastic bottles shaped with grips.

I am thankful for thermostats.  My parents had a coal furnace, and we had to be constantly thinking not letting the fire go out, but also banking the furnace so as not to waste coal.  One of my chores, since both of my parents worked outside the home, was to go right home when school let out and shovel fresh coal in the furnance.  Now I have a gas furnace that doesn’t have to be monitored at all, and a thermostat which I can turn up or down when I feel too hot or too cold.

I am thankful for luggage with wheels.  I can remember walking through airports and, before that, train stations carrying suitcases that felt like they would pull my arms out of their sockets.

I am thankful for search engines since as Google that allow me to find information in two minutes that I would have had to spend an afternoon in library to get, if I could find it at all.  I am thankful for web hosts such as WordPress that allow me to have my own web log, free of charge and without needing to be computer-savvy.  I am thankful for being able to communicate with friends in distant places through e-mail.  Not to mention spam filters which free me from having to continually purge my e-mail and web log comments.

I am thankful for direct-dial long-distance telephone service.  I can talk to people in distant states and even foreign countries at an affordable price and without having to deal with an operator.  And for telephone answering machines.  When I was a boy, telephone service was like Internet service today.  Most people had it, but a large minority didn’t.

And not all telephone users had private telephone lines. Basic telephone service in those days consisted of a party line, networking a number of households; the phones of everybody on the line rang on every call, but you were supposed to recognize the distinctive ring of your own line and not listen in to others’ calls.

Microwave ovens are a great boon to a lazy cook like me.  I do almost all my cooking nowadays, which consists mostly of frozen dinners, in the microwave.

What are your non-obvious reasons, small or large, to be thankful?

This is a version of a post I originally put up during Thanksgiving season in 2010.

Here are some of the answers I got then.

  • Back packs with shoulder padding.
  • Fleece jackets, fleece socks
  • Dedicated left turn lanes
  • No-iron fabric
  • Interstate highways
  • On-line genealogy data bases
  • Automatic clothes washers and dryers
  • Automatic dishwashers
  • Electric coffee makers
  • Refrigerators (instead of the old ice boxes)
  • Gasoline-powered lawn mowers
  • Automatic gear shifts
  • Snooze alarms
  • Digital radios
  • Digital cameras
  • Home Depot and Wal-mart
  • Amazon and e-Bay
  • Sponge rubber on table tennis bats
  • The improved Can of Worms (formerly Rochester, N.Y.’s, most obviously dangerous traffic interchange)

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4 Responses to “SMALL THANKS 2014”

  1. williambearcat Says:

    I’m thankful that I can get up to a warm floor in the winter. As a child I slept in an unheated room with the windows heavily frosted.

    Like

  2. prayerwarriorpsychicnot Says:

    Reblogged this on Citizens, not serfs.

    Like

  3. Deb Meeker Says:

    I’m very thankful I was taught to read.

    Like

  4. philebersole Says:

    I am thankful for instant coffee. For my morning wakeup drink, I microwave a cup of hot skim milk, then to stir in a spoonful of instant coffee.

    Like

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