Populism and the medical profession

Thomas Frank

Thomas Frank wrote a good article on universal health care as an example of the battle between populists and professionals.

In both the United States and Canada, the organized medical profession bitterly opposed all attempts by the public to take control of the administration of health care, either through government or voluntary co-operative organization.

But in Canada, the province of Saskatchewan in 1962, led by populist Premier Tommy Douglas, instituted Medicare for all.  The province’s medical profession responded with a general strike, which failed.

In the end, many Canadian physicians admitted they were wrong. Evidently they were motivated by mistaken opinions, not greed.  The system was rolled out nationwide in steps in 1966.  Some polls indicate that Tommy Douglas is the most admired Canadian.

President Truman proposed a universal health care system in 1948, but his plan was defeated.  So was every universal health care proposal since then.  The task force appointed by Joe Biden, this year’s presumed Democratic candidate, rejected Medicare for all.

The American Medical Association no longer wields power.  Control of medical practice has been taken over by bureaucracies, just as physicians feared.  But they are controlled not by patients or the general public, but by health insurance companies and health maintenance organizations, who are the anti-populists of today.

Frank emphasized that the original Populists and their successors in fact valued education and knowledge.  The question was and is who benefits from education and knowledge.

It is interesting that Frank’s writings do not appear on the Op Ed pages of the New York Times or Washington Post, although they deserve to be.   Frank used to be published regularly in The Guardian, but his most recent two articles appeared in the English edition of Le Monde diplomatique.  I’m not sure of the significance of that.

LINK

It’s the health care system, stupid, by Thomas Frank for Le Monde diplomatique.

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One Response to “Populism and the medical profession”

  1. ddamico361 Says:

    I thoroughly enjoyed Frank’s article. It has given me much to consider. Thank you for bringing it to our attention.

    Like

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