Archive for the ‘The Lighter Side’ Category

Degrees of ambiguity in academia

March 2, 2020

Source: XKCD.

The friend who sent me this is a retired professor of English literature.

Birdie Sanders

March 1, 2020

From Gallery of Birds That Look Like Bernie Sanders.

Baroque chamber music for train horns

December 14, 2019

Sources: The Kid Should See This and kottke.org.

Johann Pachelbel composed his Canon and Gigue for 3 violins and basso continuo sometime between 1680 and 1706,  I don’t recall ever hearing Pachelbel’s Canon under that name, but the music is strangely familiar.

A Czech named Pavel Jirásek edited short bits from ACETrainsUK’s horn compilation of trains in the United Kingdom with other clips of train horns to recreate the melody of the famous chamber music composition.

The price of anything and the value of everything

November 23, 2019

Another piece of on-line fiction that I like.

The Cambist and Lord Iron: a Fairy Tale of Economics by Daniel Abraham for Lightspeed magazine

Abraham is co-holder of the pen name James S.A. Corey and co-author of The Expanse science fiction series,

What if the Greek gods were alive and among us?

November 16, 2019

A Modern Myth by Scott Alexander for Slate Star Codex.

A last laugh from beyond the grave

October 19, 2019

Hat tip to Rod Dreher.

Shay Bradley was an Irishman who loved jokes and pranks.  He died Oct. 8, but arranged for one last prank at his burial.

I’m sure you have a good reason to look at this

September 21, 2019

An ABC of gerrymandered congressional districts

August 14, 2019

Click to enlarge

LINK

The Gerrymandered Font posted by Jason Kottke.

Abstract art at a glance (or two)

June 1, 2019

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 Source: Street Art Magic.

Sign of the times

May 18, 2019

A sign on a tree in Elizabethtown, Pa.  Hat tip to Lambert Strether.

Two wolves and a sheep vote on dinner

May 16, 2019

There’s an old saying that democracy is two wolves and a sheep voting on what to have for dinner.  For some amusing ideas of what that may mean in practice click on Two Wolves and a Sheep on Scott Alexander’s Slate Star Codex blog.

A curious reading of Curious George

March 16, 2019

You might find this funny, even if you don’t know who Werner Herzog is. And, by the way, in case you’re wondering, the reading is by a Werner Herzog imitator, not the real Werner Herzog.

What if … conspiracy theories … made sense!!!???

March 9, 2019

The following graphics are lifted from a brilliantly funny post by Scott Alexander on Slate Star Codex.
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Merle Hazard, country musician economist

February 9, 2019

Time for a change of pace.  Merle Hazard (not to be confused with the great Merle Haggard) claims to be the world’s leading country musician-economist.  Click on his name for more about him and more selections.  Hat tip to kottke.org.

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Why I’ve given up watching network TV news

January 18, 2019

I recommend you view this in the enlarged version, if you can’t see the dates of the various short clips in the upper right corner of the screen.

 I’m not a supporter of President Trump, but this is ridiculous..

A choice of superpowers

December 29, 2018

I enjoyed the following on-line story, and maybe you will, too.

And I Show You How Deep the Rabbit Hole Goes by Scott Alexander on Slate Star Codex.

Another experiment in educational reform

December 26, 2018


Source: Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal.

Hat tip to Physicist at Large.

Santa Claus in the 21st century

December 23, 2018

An interview with Santa’s lawyer by John Scalzi.   Hat tip to the Weekly Sift.

Who’s listening?

December 5, 2018

Source: XKCD.

Caterpillars on parade

November 10, 2018

I can’t help but find this funny.

Seen in a public library

September 15, 2018

I forget where I came across this on the Internet.  For the benefit of non-American and younger visitors to this blog, the numbers are part of the old Dewey decimal system of library subject classifications; that system came into existence before the digital age.

A mock Bugatti Chiron built of Lego parts

September 8, 2018

Lego engineers built a driveable duplicate of a $2.6 million Bugatti Chiron sports car, using more than 1 million Lego parts.

It uses real Bugatti wheels and tires, a steel frame and batteries for power, but more than 90 percent of the car is Lego parts, including 2,300 Lego Technic Power Function motors and 4,632 Lego Technic gear wheels.

It has a fully functional steering wheel, brakes (but no accelerator), headlights, tail lights, speedometer and doors that open and close.  No glue was used in putting the parts together.

A real Bugatti Chiron is made of about 1,800 parts.  It has a 1,500 horsepower motor and a top speed of 261 miles per hour.  The Lego version has a 5.3 HP motor and a theoretical top speed of 18 miles per hour.

But it works!  I bet it was a lot of fun to work on.

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A cartoon history of metaphysics

September 1, 2018

Click to enlarge.

Source: Existential Comics.

Fun with street art

June 30, 2018

Time for something a little lighter.

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A street artist who calls himself Tom Bob has fun with everyday objects.

Click on the links below for more of Tom Bob’s art.

There’s a Genius Street Artist Running Loose in New York City and Let’s Hope Nobody Catches Him by Monika for Bored Panda.

There’s a Genius Street Artist Running Loose in the Streets and Let’s Hope Nobody Catches Him (30+ New Pics) by Ilona for Bored Panda.

Ted Forth and the IRS scammer

June 16, 2018

Time for something a little lighter.

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Source: Ted Forth and the IRS Scammer on Medium Large.