Archive for the ‘The Unofficial Rules’ Category

The hobo ethical code of 1889

January 1, 2017

hbo-code-1024x586

Hoboes were itinerant workers who traveled illegally by freight car, and gathered in camps called “hobo jungles”.   Most respectable people looked down on them.   This formal ethical code was adopted at the Hobo National Convention of 1889.

1.  Decide your own life; don’t let another person run or rule you.

2.  When in town, always respect the local law and officials, and try to be a gentleman at all times.

3.  Don’t take advantage of someone who is in a vulnerable situation, locals or other hobos.

4.  Always try to find work, even if temporary, and always seek out jobs nobody wants. By doing so you not only help a business along, but ensure employment should you return to that town again.

5.  When no employment is available, make your own work by using your added talents at crafts.

6.  Do not allow yourself to become a stupid drunk and set a bad example for locals’ treatment of other hobos.

7.  When jungling in town, respect handouts, do not wear them out, another hobo will be coming along who will need them as badly, if not worse than you.

8.  Always respect nature, do not leave garbage where you are jungling.

9.  If in a community jungle, always pitch in and help.

10.  Try to stay clean, and boil up wherever possible.

11.  When traveling, ride your train respectfully, take no personal chances, cause no problems with the operating crew or host railroad, act like an extra crew member.

12.  Do not cause problems in a train yard, another hobo will be coming along who will need passage through that yard.

13.  Do not allow other hobos to molest children; expose all molesters to authorities…they are the worst garbage to infest any society.

14.  Help all runaway children, and try to induce them to return home.

15.  Help your fellow hobos whenever and wherever needed, you may need their help someday.

Source: BRKTrail

Words to live by.

Douglas Adams’ rules of technology

March 15, 2016

1.  Anything that is in the world when you’re born is normal and ordinary and is just a natural part of the way the world works.

2.  Anything that’s invented between when you’re fifteen and thirty-five is new and exciting and revolutionary and you can probably get a career in it.

3.  Anything invented after you’re thirty-five is against the natural order of things.

Source: Stumbling and Mumbling

Carl Sagan’s baloney detection checklist

May 29, 2014
  1. Wherever possible there must be independent confirmation of the “facts.”
  2. Encourage substantive debate on the evidence by knowledgeable proponents of all points of view.
  3. Arguments from authority carry little weight — “authorities” have made mistakes in the past.  They will do so again in the future.  Perhaps a better way to say it is that in science there are no authorities; at most, there are experts.
  4. Carl_Sagan_by_Takes2ToTricycleSpin more than one hypothesis.  If there’s something to be explained, think of all the different ways in which it could be explained.  Then think of tests by which you might systematically disprove each of the alternatives.  What survives, the hypothesis that resists disproof in this Darwinian selection among “multiple working hypotheses,” has a much better chance of being the right answer than if you had simply run with the first idea that caught your fancy.
  5. Try not to get overly attached to a hypothesis just because it’s yours.  It’s only a way station in the pursuit of knowledge.  Ask yourself why you like the idea.  Compare it fairly with the alternatives.  See if you can find reasons for rejecting it.  If you don’t, others will.
  6. Quantify.  If whatever it is you’re explaining has some measure, some numerical quantity attached to it, you’ll be much better able to discriminate among competing hypotheses.  What is vague and qualitative is open to many explanations.  Of course there are truths to be sought in the many qualitative issues we are obliged to confront, but finding them is more challenging.
  7. If there’s a chain of argument, every link in the chain must work (including the premise) — not just most of them.
  8. Occam’s Razor.  This convenient rule-of-thumb urges us when faced with two hypotheses that explain the data equally well to choose the simpler.
  9. Always ask whether the hypothesis can be, at least in principle, falsified.  Propositions that are untestable, unfalsifiable are not worth much.  Consider the grand idea that our Universe and everything in it is just an elementary particle — an electron, say — in a much bigger Cosmos.  But if we can never acquire information from outside our Universe, is not the idea incapable of disproof?   You must be able to check assertions out.
  10. Inveterate skeptics must be given the chance to follow your reasoning, to duplicate your experiments and see if they get the same result.

via Brain Pickings.   Hat tip to Barry Ritholtz.

Click on Who Was Carl Sagan? for more about him.

The unbreakable rule about insiders

May 13, 2014

In the spring of 2009, Elizabeth Warren, then chair of the Congressional Oversight Panel on the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP), was taken to lunch by Larry Summers, then director of the National Economic Council and a top adviser to President Obama.

Summers, … … she recalls, told her that she had a choice to make. She could be an insider or an outsider, but if she was going to be an insider she needed to understand one unbreakable rule about insiders: “They don’t criticize other insiders.”

The quote is from a review of Senator Warren’s autobiography, A Fighting Chance, by Jill Lepore in the New Yorker.  The whole review is well worth reading. Click on Reading Elizabeth Warren to read it.

John Cage’s 10 rules for students and teachers

April 27, 2014

RULE ONE: Find a place you trust, and then try trusting it for a while.

RULE TWO: General duties of a student: Pull everything out of your teacher; pull everything out of your fellow students.

John Cage

John Cage

RULE THREE: General duties of a teacher: Pull everything out of your students.

RULE FOUR: Consider everything an experiment.

RULE FIVE: Be self-disciplined: this means finding someone wise or smart and choosing to follow them.  To be disciplined is to follow in a good way.  To be self-disciplined is to follow in a better way.

RULE SIX: Nothing is a mistake. There’s no win and no fail, there’s only make.

RULE SEVEN: The only rule is work.  If you work it will lead to something.  It’s the people who do all of the work all of the time who eventually catch on to things.

RULE EIGHT: Don’t try to create and analyze at the same time.  They’re different processes.

RULE NINE: Be happy whenever you can manage it.  Enjoy yourself.  It’s lighter than you think.

RULE TEN: We’re breaking all the rules.  Even our own rules.  And how do we do that?  By leaving plenty of room for X quantities.

HINTS: Always be around.  Come or go to everything.  Always go to classes.  Read anything you can get your hands on.  Look at movies carefully, often.  Save everything.  It might come in handy later.

via 10 Rules for Students and Teachers Popularized by John Cage – Open Culture.

http://marginalrevolution.com/marginalrevolution/2014/04/john-cages-rules-for-students-and-teachers.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Cage

John Pennington: My Great Wisdom at 75

April 23, 2014
  1. 1e5bc8e4c9ccccf537ae057d22e53c67I learned at age eleven, at the sunburned end of the first day the public pool was open, that pale skin is not superior.
  2. Real food has one ingredient.
  3. Never buy food from someone who gets an annual bonus.
  4. There is nothing corporations won’t do for profit. Take toothpaste. What used to be one or two kinds per manufacturer now takes up ten feet of shelf space because they now make the same stuff in twelve different flavors.
  5. The US is a great place, a huge country with astonishing and beautiful things to experience.
  6. The US is a lousy place where only money matters, plagued by too many people who view themselves as chosen because they have a lot of it.
  7. The US has been a bully from Day One. Every two years on average we invade a small country in order to seize its riches, destroy its government, and impoverish its people.
  8. By 20 I was sure I was a mature adult. It turned out that wasn’t exactly true.
  9. Hatred is an equal opportunity religion. Every religion has followers who somehow miss the central message about love, tolerance, and compassion, and spend their time murdering people they don’t know.
  10. Revenge is equally stupid, with the same result.
  11. Politicians should be amateurs who go home when their sentence is up.
  12. Corporations, like religions, should be prohibited in politics entirely.
  13. Money isn’t speech. Speech is speech. Corporations aren’t people. People are people.
  14. Fundamentalist Christians are trying to impose their version of Sharia on us.
  15. Gay is not a “lifestyle”. Your kids can’t be “recruited”, either.
  16. You’re not going to look great when you get old. Don’t worry about it.
  17. The older you get, the more weird things grow on your body.
  18. Every abortion marks a failure. Regardless, anti-abortionists should get the hell out of your womb.
  19. I’ll worry about abortion when all of the 13,000 daily unnecessary deaths of living, breathing children cease to happen because anti-abortionists did something about it.
  20. People who are a lot smarter than you are not necessarily right, and the world is full of rich fools.
  21. You can be happy at any age. Unfortunately, you can also be unhappy at any age, but happy is better so let yourself be happy if you can.
  22. Spanish is not a foreign language. The US is not America. Puerto Ricans are not immigrants.
  23. Immigrants should learn the prevailing language of their new country. In much of the US that language is Spanish, and the immigrants are Anglos.
  24. There is no official language in the US. If there were to be, perhaps it should be Navajo.
  25. Being dead is no big deal, and worrying about it is a waste of time. Now, dying is another matter. If you want to worry, worry about dying. But that won’t change anything either, so why bother.
  26. The older you get, the more time you have.
  27. Everything changes. Everything.
  28. All of humanity is of no consequence. Neither is the Earth, or even our solar system. In fact, our Milky Way Galaxy, where the closest of uncountable stars is much too far for humans to reach in a single lifetime, is only one of billions. This shouldn’t make us feel insignificant. We should feel amazed at being part of this astonishing universe.

Source: My Great Wisdom At 75 from Class War in America.

Eligibility rule for humanitarian war advocates

September 17, 2013

Blogger Duncan Black, aka Atrios, has a new unofficial rule.

Any pundit who advocates war for supposed humanitarian reasons must be able to point to 5 recent occasions when they advocated for achieving humanitarian goals using non-killing methods.

Otherwise, STFU.

via Eschaton.

How to destroy education in just three steps

June 11, 2013

1.  Make educational credentials a requirement for getting a good job.

2.  Define qualification for a good job as the sole purpose of education.

3.  Blame and punish educators for the lack of good  jobs.

How to kill higher education, in five easy steps

June 11, 2013

I am grateful for my liberal arts education for how it has helped me to understand the world I live in and the culture in which I live. The kind of liberal arts education I received is being undermined. The process is described in this post.

1. DEFUND PUBLIC HIGHER EDUCATION.

2. DEPROFESSIONALIZE AND IMPOVERISH THE PROFESSORS by replacing them by marginally-employed adjuncts and video lessons.

3. MOVE IN A MANAGERIAL / ADMINISTRATIVE CLASS WHO TAKE OVER GOVERNANCE OF THE UNIVERSITY.

4. MOVE IN CORPORATE CULTURE AND CORPORATE MONEY.

5. DESTROY THE STUDENTS by raising tuition and lowering the quality of education.

I never worked in academia, but I have friends who do, and everything in this post fits what they tell me.

The Homeless Adjunct

A few years back, Paul E. Lingenfelter began his report on the defunding of public education by saying, “In 1920 H.G. Wells wrote, ‘History is becoming more and more a race between education and catastrophe.’ I think he got it right. Nothing is more important to the future of the United States and the world than the breadth and effectiveness of education, especially of higher education. I say especially higher education, but not because pre- school, elementary, and secondary education are less important. Success at every level of education obviously depends on what has gone before. But for better or worse, the quality of postsecondary education and research affects the quality and effectiveness of education at every level.”

In the last few years, conversations have been growing like gathering storm clouds about the ways in which our universities are failing. There is talk about the poor educational outcomes apparent in…

View original post 4,142 more words

Instructions for Life by the Dalai Lama

June 2, 2013

1.  dalai-lamaTake into account that great love and great achievements involve great risk.

2.  When you lose, don’t lose the lesson.

3.  Follow the three R’s: – Respect for self, – Respect for others and – Responsibility for all your actions.

4.  Remember that not getting what you want is sometimes a wonderful stroke of luck.

5.  Learn the rules so you know how to break them properly.

6.  Don’t let a little dispute injure a great relationship.

7.  When you realize you’ve made a mistake, take immediate steps to correct it.

8.  Spend some time alone every day.

9.  Open your arms to change, but don’t let go of your values.

10.  Remember that silence is sometimes the best answer.

11.  Live a good, honorable life. Then when you get older and think back, you’ll be able to enjoy it a second time.

12.  A loving atmosphere in your home is the foundation for your life.

13.  In disagreements with loved ones, deal only with the current situation. Don’t bring up the past.

14.  Share your knowledge. It is a way to achieve immortality.

15.  Be gentle with the earth.

16.  Once a year, go someplace you’ve never been before.

17.  Remember that the best relationship is one in which your love for each other exceeds your need for each other.

18.  Judge your success by what you had to give up in order to get it.

19.  If you want others to be happy, practice compassion.

20.  If you want to be happy, practice compassion.

Hat tip to Watering Good Seeds

Malanowski’s Laws of Politics

May 29, 2013

Malanowski’s First Law of Politics is that the rich and powerful will always act in their own self interest.

Malanowski’s Second Law is that the rich and powerful will then get the rest of us to act in their interest as well, usually by making us believe that we hold this interest in common.

Malanowski’s Third Law is that when the rest of us figure out ways to act in our own self-interests, the rich and powerful are likely to outlaw whatever we’ve come up with.

I found Malanowki’s Laws on Apple: Living the Lie, a post on Jamie Malanowki’s official web log.

The two-soprano rule

April 25, 2013

In judging a two-person singing contest,

never award the prize to the second soprano

having heard only the first.

via The Reality-Based Community.

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Nassim Nicholas Taleb’s five rules for policy

March 23, 2013

Rule 1.  Think of the economy as more like a cat than a washing machine.

Rule 2.  Favor businesses that benefit from their own mistakes, not those whose mistakes percolate into the system.

Rule 3.  Small is beautiful, but it is also efficient.

Rule 4.  Trial and error beats academic knowledge.

Rule 5.  Decision-makers must have skin in the game.

Nassim Nicholas Taleb is a successful Wall Street options trader and author of a new book, ANTIFRAGILE: Things That Gain from Disorder.  In a recent article in the Wall Street Journal, he laid down those five wise rules for economic policy-makers.

The economy is organic, like a cat, and not mechanical, like a washing machine.  Every kind of stress on a machine causes it to wear out faster.  But a living animal thrives on stress, up to a point.  Animals and other organic systems are best left alone, except in dire emergency.

One of Taleb’s examples of businesses that learn from their own mistakes is the airline industry.  Every time there is an airplane crash, the airline companies study the causes of the crash and incorporate that information into their practices.  In a sense, every airline crash makes the airlines safer.  Another example is Silicon Valley, where failure is not regarded as a disgrace and the idea is to “fail quickly” so you can go on to try something.   The opposite of this is the Wall Street banking industry, where every bank failure weakens the overall system.

An industry is strongest when it consists of many small units, where the failure of an individual business makes the survivors stronger.  Taleb cited the restaurant business, in which the failure of an individual restaurant is common but the failure of the restaurant industry as a whole is unimaginable.  Failures mean the best restaurants survive, and so the industry is ever-improving (assuming, I would add, that the big chain restaurants don’t drive the individually-owned restaurants out of business).  Government is least harmful, he wrote, when it is vested in the lowest and possible unit, as in Switzerland.

We should honor failed entrepreneurs in the same spirit that we honor warriors who fall in battle.  It is through their individual sacrifice contributes that society as a whole survives and prospers.

He is skeptical of top-down planning, whether done by government, corporations or some other form of corporation.  The best economic and social system is one that allows trial and error in which the errors are small and are a source of knowledge and improvement.  Experimentation and tinkering, not theory, is the source of technological and economic progress.

The trouble with most journalists, academics and government policy-makers is that they suffer no penalty for being wrong, not even a loss of reputation.  Even worse are Wall Street bankers, who are able to pocket the gains from their successes and push their losses onto the taxpayers.   He said the government in a humane society ought to provide for the weak and help the unlucky get back on their feet, but it should never bail out a failed business.  If a business is too big to fail, he said, nobody in that business should receive greater compensation than the most highly-paid civil servant.

Taleb admires Ralph Nader because he is the opposite of a Wall Street banker.  Nader accepts personal risks and sacrifices in order to confer benefits on society as a whole.

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A young man’s lessons from life

February 27, 2013

A young man who posts on BlogTruth summed up some lessons that life has taught him so far.

Many never learn these lessons until much later in life, and some never learn at all.

  1. Listen at least twice as much as you speak.  Think deeply, speak softly.
  2. Don’t give advice unless asked for it.  When you give advice, tread lightly.
  3. Put yourself in others’ shoes.  See the world through others’ eyes.  Assume nothing.
  4. Adopt an iron clad policy of honesty and integrity.  Never steal.  Try not to lie, embellish or gossip.
  5. Be good to your wife and compliment her often, even when she looks like hell—especially when she looks like hell.

via BlogTruth | Observations from a student of life.

Three red flags on environmental impact

February 22, 2013
  • Beware of projects that risk permanent harm in return for short-term gains.  This is the reverse of mainstream economic thinking, which privileges present value over future value.
  • Beware of risk assessments.  An insurance actuary can accurately estimate the risk of common events, but there is no accurate way to estimate the risk of catastrophic events that rarely happen or haven’t yet happened.  It is much safer to weigh what you have to gain against what you have to lose.
  • Beware of projects that require waivers of laws.  If an environmental law, or a health and safety law, is harmful or unnecessary, it should be repealed, but if it is needful, then there shouldn’t be any exceptions.

Goodhart’s law: on not going by the numbers

January 10, 2013

Charles Goodhart was an adviser to the Bank of England in 1975.  The advice he gave then has been summarized as Goodhart’s law, which has been summarized as follows:

All economic models break down when used for policy.

Charles Goodhart

Charles Goodhart

His version

Any observed statistical regularity will tend to collapse once pressure is placed upon it for control purposes.’

Another short version

When a measure becomes a target, it ceases to be a good measure.

Defense Secretary Robert McNamara demanded a graph of numbers that would show whether or not the United States was winning in Vietnam.  Sure enough, the military responded with “body count” figures that showed the Viet Cong were all being killed many times over, but the United States lost the war.

I thought of Goodhart’s Law in connection with President Bush’s No Child Left Behind and President Obama’s Race to the Top programs.  Teachers and schools are judged on the basis of test results.  So the incentive is for teachers to improve, not learning, but the numbers by which learning supposedly is measured.  Dishonest teachers cheat.  Honest teachers have to take time away from teaching the material to teaching how to pass the test.

The aim is evidence-based policy.  The result is policy-based evidence.

As Cory Doctorow explained on Boing Boing:

Once you start measuring GDP as a way of gauging social welfare, people will start to figure out ways to make GDP go up without improving social welfare (say, by swapping dirty financial derivatives).  Once Google starts measuring inbound links as a way of evaluating the importance of web-pages, people will figure out how to increase the inbound links to unimportant pages (splogging, blogspam).  And once you measure fat or calorie content as a proxy for the healthfulness of food, manufacturers will figure out how to decrease fat and calories without making the food more healthful (reducing fat by adding sugar, reducing calories by adding poisonous artificial sweeteners).

The prime example of Goodhart’s Law in action is Soviet economic planning.  Factories were evaluated on the basis of measured output, irrespective of the usefulness of what was produced.  Machinery factories were actually judged on the total weight of the machinery they produced.  That is why there is no substitute for free markets and the workings of supply and demand.  But large corporations often operate like mini-Soviet Unions until reality catches up with them.

W. Edwards Deming, who was possibly the world’s greatest exponent of using statistics to improvement business performance, objected to judging either managers or workers based on numerical goals.  Understand and improve the process, and the numbers will improve, he said, but trying to improve the numbers without understanding the process is an exercise in futility.

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George Carlin on incentives

December 7, 2012

george-carlin-conservatives-say-if-you-dont-give-the-rich-more-money-they-will-lose-their-incentive-to-invest-as-for-the-poor-they-tell-us-theyve-lost-all-incentive-because-weve-given

Pollard’s Laws

October 17, 2012

Pollard’s Law of Human Behaviour: We do what we must (our personal, unavoidable imperatives of the moment), then we do what’s easy, and then we do what’s fun.  There is never time left for things that are merely important.

Pollard’s Law of Complexity: Things are the way they are for a reason. If you want to change something, it helps to know that reason. If that reason is complex, success at changing it is unlikely, and adapting to it is probably a better strategy.

Pollard’s Laws are from an essay entitled Why We Cannot Save The World by Dave Pollard.  If you read the essay, you’ll see he is extremely pessimistic about the near-term future.   I hope he’s wrong, but he may be right.   By his account of his life story, he has earned the right to his pessimism.

He is right to say that trying to understand the world, and to share your understanding, is a worthwhile effort.  As Bertrand Russell once said, half the useful work that is done in the world consists of trying to  undo the harmful work.  And he is right to say that pessimism about the world is no excuse for failing to enjoy and feel grateful for life’s blessings.

If you commit a gaffe … …

September 24, 2012

Zadie Smith’s 10 rules for writing fiction

September 22, 2012
  1. When still a child, make sure you read a lot of books.  Spend more time doing this than anything else.
  2. Zadie Smith

    When an adult, try to read your own work as a stranger would read it, or even better, as an enemy would.

  3. Don’t romanticize your “vocation” . You can either write good sentences or you can’t.  There is no “writer’s lifestyle”.  All that matters is what you leave on the page.
  4. Avoid your weaknesses.  But do this without telling yourself that the things you can’t do aren’t worth doing.  Don’t mask self-doubt with contempt.
  5. Leave a decent space of time between writing something and editing it.
  6. Avoid cliques, gangs, groups.  The presence of a crowd won’t make your writing any better than it is.
  7. Work on a computer that is disconnected from the ­internet.
  8. Protect the time and space in which you write.  Keep everybody away from it, even the people who are most important to you.
  9. Don’t confuse honors with achievement.
  10. Tell the truth through whichever veil comes to hand — but tell it.  Resign yourself to the lifelong sadness that comes from never ­being satisfied.

The Guardian of London, inspired by Elmore Leonard’s 10 rules for writing fiction, asked 28 other fiction writers, including Zadie Smith, for their own rules.

Click on Ten rules for writing fiction and Ten rules for writing fiction (part two) for all their replies, plus Elmore Leonard’s rules.

Click on Kurt Vonnegut’s eight rules for writing fiction and Henry Miller’s 11 commandments for writers for more rules.

I spent 40 years in which I wrote nearly every working day, and got paid for it, and, in retirement, I still feel the urge to write.  Hence this blog.  But I doubt if I ever had the ability, and I am sure I never had the commitment, to be a Zadie Smith, Elmore Leonard, Kurt Vonnegut or Henry Miller.

Murphy’s law in theory and practice

September 6, 2012

As Mark Sackler wrote on his Millennium Conjectures web log, Murphy’s Law is the only law that works better in practice than it does in theory.

The Two-Soprano Rule

August 19, 2012

As the judge in a singing contest,

never award the prize to the second soprano

having heard only the first.

via The Reality-Based Community.

How to Treat a Woman? | Ask Old Jules

July 22, 2012

Old Jules is the handle of a blogger who lives in the Texas hill country.  In his Ask Old Jules blog, he answers questions from readers such as this one.

Old Jules, what can you tell me about how to treat a woman I care about?

I was only married 25 years, divorced 15 years ago.  Still learning a lot, but I think there are some learnings I’ve gleaned from 45 years of intimate contacts with women.

  1. Be attentive and listen to what they say, even if you don’t agree or like what you hear.  The person probably knows you better than anyone else on the planet. Knows things about you that you don’t even know about yourself.  Listen and consider what’s said, ponder whether it’s true, or untrue.  And ponder whether, if true, it’s something you respect in yourself and don’t wish to change, or something you’d like yourself better if you changed.   Not for the woman you care about, but for yourself.
  2. Respect boundaries.   Recognize the woman you care about is a human being with a life and desires unrelated to your own.  Recognize for your own benefit and for hers that much of what goes on in her head, her heart, and her life is simply none of your business unless she chooses to tell you.  Care enough about her to support her needs and goals even if they mean nothing to you.
  3. Don’t expect your woman, nor anyone else, to ‘make you happy’.  That’s your responsibility.  Not hers.
  4. Don’t use the phrase, “You make me feel [fill in the blank]”.  Nobody ‘makes you feel’ any way.  People behave the way they do and you choose how you will feel about it.
  5. Remember things you might consider unimportant if they are important to her.  Valentines, anniversaries, birthdays and just simple hugs, hand-squeezes and touches mean a lot more to most women than they mean to many of us men.  It’s a small thing to us, but frequently a big thing to them.  Not doing it is nearly certain to result in frustration and tension.
  6. Remember to say “I love you” frequently if you want to keep the woman you care about feeling you are the man she cares about.

Click on Make a Girl Like Me? for another sample of Old Jules’ wisdom.

Click on Ask Old Jules and So Far From Heaven for Old Jules’ blogs.

Sebastian’s Rule

June 8, 2012

Don’t give sweeping new powers to a branch of government that you wouldn’t ever want to see in the hands of your political opponents.

via Obsidian Wings.

Bertrand Russell’s maxims for paranoids

June 3, 2012

1.  Remember that your motives are not always as altruistic as they seem to yourself.

2. Don’t overestimate your own merits.

3.  Don’t expect others to take as much interest in you as you do yourself.

4.  Don’t imagine that most other people give enough thought to you to have any desire to persecute you.

These maxims are from Bertrand Russell’s The Conquest of Happiness.

Click on Bertrand Russell Bulletin for information about Bertrand Russell and the Bertrand Russell Society.

Click on Russell Texts Online for writings by Bertrand Russell.

Click on Bertrand Russell Facebook for more about Russell.

Click on Schedule of Greater Rochester Russell Set for Russell-related talks and discussions in Rochester, N.Y.