Posts Tagged ‘Family Farms’

Why are small farmers more productive?

April 13, 2015

A study by an organization called GRAIN concludes that, although small farmers produce more than half the world’s food, they own only a quarter of the world’s land, and that their share is shrinking.

I think the same principle is at work here, to a lesser extent, as was the case in the USSR and China under Stalin and Mao, when forced collective farming resulted in starvation.

On small farms, owners are the same as managers, and, even if they have hired hands, they are not separate from the workers.  Naturally they will work harder, pay closer attention and exercise more independent judgment than if they were employees of a big corporation or a government.

Why, then, are large farming operations crowding out the small independent farmers?  My guess is that it is because they have economies of scale that lower operating costs per acre, more bargaining power in dealing with lenders, suppliers and food buyers, and, last but far from least, more influence with governments.

LINK

GRAIN – hungry for land: small farmers feed the world with less than a quarter of all farmland.

 

Vanishing farmers and disposable workers

February 4, 2014

Yukon raven by gavatronIan Welsh on his web log pointed out the connection between the decline of farming and the growth of sweatshops.  He noted how the connection operated in England during the Industrial Revolution, in Mexico under NAFTA and also in the United States.

After World War II Americans flooded from the farms into the new cities. For this generation, the GI generation, it was a straight upgrade: their lives were better. They worked less hours, they had more food, they had access to power and indoor plumbing, and good jobs with good pay.

Those Americans were treated very well, and if you weren’t black, the 1950s and 1960s are looked back on as the heyday of American prosperity. Good jobs were plentiful and easy to find and they came with healthcare and good pensions. Life was good.

Today, millennials and Gen-Xers don’t have such a good deal. Unemployment is high, if you lose your job you will have a hard time finding as good one, or a job at all, and good pensions and healthcare plans are more and more uncommon, and increasingly restricted to the executive class.

Why? Well, one reason is this, the family farms are gone.  The first generation had to be treated well because they had options: they could go back to the family farm. So their jobs, and their lives as consumers had to be clearly superior to being on a farm.

Click on The Disposable Economy to read his whole post.