Posts Tagged ‘New York’

Election fraud charged in Democratic primaries

May 13, 2016

lawsuit-book-and-paperAn organization called Election Justice USA has filed a lawsuit charging election fraud in New York state’s primary election.  A reporter for Counterpunch obtained the complaint and the exhibits.  Here is what was charged:

According to Stewart McCauley, who helped collect the data and analyzed it by affidavit for Exhibit I, EJUSA has found that “[t]here are four broad methodologies that were used” to disenfranchise New York voters, the first two of which were also present in Arizona.

“Two by hackers (possibly), and two that had to have been carried out by BoE [Board of Elections] officials and/or employees:

1) Logging in (most likely after identifying the voter’s candidate of choice) to the BoE database remotely and tampering with registration records, including back-dating of changes

2) Crudely forged hand signatures to alter party affiliation via paper forms

3) BoE “nuclear” approach: actively purging eligible voters through a variety of methods, including intentional bouncing of maintenance letters (but note that the majority of our respondents/plaintiffs could not legally be removed as it has been less than five years since they registered)

4) BoE officials and employees actively neglecting to register new voters.”

Source: Counterpunch.

The whole U.S. civil order rests on public acceptance of the outcomes of elections as legitimate.   It is possible for a reform candidate to mobilize people power to overcome the built-in advantages that the rich and powerful have in the electoral process.  But that is only true if citizens can register to vote and the votes are counted.

The right to vote, and have your right counted, is the only way you have of ensuring your other rights are respected—short of revolution.

(more…)

Bad Paper: The world of the debt collector

October 20, 2014

Jake Halpern wrote a New Yorker article, and then a book, Bad Paper (which I haven’t read), about the debt collection industry.  He was interviewed by Bloomberg’s Megan McArdle.

My mom was getting hounded by a debt collector for a bill that she did not owe.  She eventually paid it just to get him to stop harassing her.

bad.paperI started investigating and found out that much debt-collection activities were in my hometown of Buffalo, New York.  I ended up writing a profile on a Buffalo-based debt collector who bought and sold and collected on debt for pennies on the dollar; that story ran in the New Yorker.

That New Yorker story got optioned by Brad Pitt’s production company.  So I went back to Buffalo with the screenwriter.

No one wanted to talk to a journalist back when I was doing the New Yorker piece, but now that I was with Brad Pitt, everyone talked.  One night, the screenwriter and I go out to dinner with a banker and a former armed robber who had gone into business with one another.

They tell me an incredible tale.  They purchased $1.5 billion worth of bad debt for pennies on the dollar. Their aim was to make a fortune.   All goes well on this unlikely venture until some of the debt is stolen and the former armed robber must delve into an underworld where debt is bought and sold on street corners.  This quest ends in a showdown with guns in the inner city of Buffalo, New York.

The world Halpern describes is lower on the economic food chain than the one described by Matt Taibbi in The Divide, but the process is basically the same.  A lender decides it is not worth the effort to collect on certain bad debts, and sells the debt to a collection agency for pennies on the dollar.

The problem is the lack of reliable information as to what is owed and for what.  Sometimes the collectors don’t know how much is principal and how much is accrued interest.  Sometimes unscrupulous lenders will sell the same debt to several collection agencies.

Halpern said he wound up having more sympathy with debt collectors than he expected.  It is one of the few occupations open to convicted felons.  The central figure in his New Yorker article was a former cocaine dealer trying to go straight.

What does he think needs to be changed about debt collection?

(more…)