Posts Tagged ‘Nuclear Disasters’

Irradiated U.S. veterans to get help from Japan

July 11, 2017

Former diplomat Peter Van Buren reported on his web log how the U.S. Department of Defense rejected claims by U.S. troops who were irradiated during rescue efforts at the Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster.   It has fallen to a former Japanese prime minister to come to their aid.

Junichiro Koizumi

The U.S. Navy rushed thousands of troops to the scene in 2011 to help Japanese disaster victims, after an earthquake and tsunami caused meltdown of the Fukushima plant.

A few years later, hundreds of them began to report symptoms of radiation disease—rectal and gynecological bleeding, thyroid problems, leukemia and testicular and brain cancers, Van Buren said.  Some had worked in the area of the nuclear disaster, some had flown over it and some had drunk desalinated sea water from the contaminated ocean.

The U.S. Department of Defense, relying on information from the Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO), said they couldn’t possibly have received high enough levels of radiation to be harmful.   Some 400 service members are suing TEPCO, but this lawsuit will take years to resolve, and seven of the plaintiffs already have died.

Former Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi, who left office five years before the disaster, has started a fund-raising appeal to raise $1 million to help the U.S. veterans pay medical bills.   Van Buren said Koizumi already has raised $400,000 through lecture fees.

As an American, I am grateful to Prime Minister Koizumi and ashamed of this example of U.S. government neglect of American veterans.

LINK

Abandoned by U.S. Government, Irradiated Servicemembers Turn to Japan for Help by Peter Van Buren for We Meant Well.

A Fukushima on the Hudson?

April 4, 2016

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NY-DN874_NYINDI_16U_20150414182440Ellen Cantarow and Alison Rose Levy wrote an alarming and plausible article for TomDispatch about the likelihood of a Fukushima-type accident at the Indian Point nuclear power plant outside New York City.

The Indian Point plant has a terrible safety record, even by industry standards.  There is an ongoing leak of tritium (radioactive) water, whose source has not been identified, into local groundwater and the Hudson River.  There is a known danger of flooding, which could cause a meltdown of the reactor core, but management of Entergy, the owner of Indian Point, has declined to install a $200,000 flood detector.

Now a high-pressure natural gas pipeline is planned by an energy company called Spectra, would carry fracked gas within 150 feet of Indian Point.  Accidents in gas pipelines are on the rise, according to a study by the National Transportation Safety Board, due to gas companies cutting corners on safety.

How much risk should the nearly 20 million people who live in the vicinity of Indian Point assume?

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A call for a UN takeover of Fukushima

October 4, 2013

Mike Connelly reminded me the ongoing disaster and danger from the Fukushima nuclear power plant meltdown in Japan.  This article by Harvey Wasserman for Common Dreams summarizes the situation very well.

For decades the atomic industry claimed vehemently that a commercial reactor could not explode. When Chernobyl blew, it blamed “inferior” Soviet technology.

But Fukushima’s designs are from General Electric (some two dozen similar reactors are licensed in the US).  At least four explosions have rocked the site.  One might have involved nuclear fission.  Three cores have melted into the ground.  Massive quantities of water have been poured where the owner, Tokyo Electric (Tepco), and the Japanese government think they might be, but nobody knows for sure.

As the Free Press has reported, steam emissions indicate one or more may still be hot.  Contaminated water is leaking from hastily-constructed tanks. Room for more is running out. The inevitable next earthquake could rupture them all and send untold quantities of poisons pouring into the ocean.

The worst immediate threat at Fukushima lies in the spent fuel pool at Unit Four.  That reactor had been shut for routine maintenance when the earthquake and tsunami hit. T he 400-ton core, with more than 1300 fuel rods, sat in its pool 100 feet in the air.

Spent fuel rods are the most lethal items our species has ever created. A human standing within a few feet of one would die in a matter of minutes. With more than 11,000 scattered around the Daichi site, radiation levels could rise high enough to force the evacuation of all workers and immobilize much vital electronic equipment.

Spent fuel rods must be kept cool at all times. If exposed to air, their zirconium alloy cladding will ignite, the rods will burn and huge quantities of radiation will be emitted. Should the rods touch each other, or should they crumble into a big enough pile, an explosion is possible. By some estimates there’s enough radioactivity embodied in the rods to create a fallout cloud 15,000 times greater than the one from the Hiroshima bombing.

The rods perched in the Unit 4 pool are in an extremely dangerous position. The building is tipping and sinking into the sodden ground. The fuel pool itself may have deteriorated. The rods are embrittled and prone to crumbling. Just 50 meters from the base is a common spent fuel pool containing some 6,000 fuel rods that could be seriously compromised should it lose coolant. Overall there are some 11,000 spent rods scattered around the Fukushima Daichi site.

Dangerous as the process might be, the rods in the Unit Four fuel pool must come down in an orderly fashion. Another earthquake could easily cause the building to crumble and collapse. Should those rods crash to the ground and be left uncooled, the consequences would be catastrophic.

Tepco has said it will begin trying to remove the rods from that pool in November. The petitions circulating through www.nukefree.org and www.moveon.org , as well as at rootsaction.org and avaaz.org, ask that the United Nations take over. They ask the world scientific and engineering communities to step in. The Rootsaction petition also asks that $8.3 billion slated in loan guarantees for a new US nuke be shifted instead to dealing with the Fukushima site.

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Black swans and nuclear disasters

September 16, 2013

When I was a business reporter for the Democrat and Chronicle here in Rochester, N.Y., I interviewed, and largely believed, supposed experts on risk about how members of the lay public exaggerated the dangers of nuclear power.

These risk specialists said people feared nuclear power because they were prone to irrational fear of dangers that potentially are great, but whose possibility of actually occurring are so small as to be virtually non-existent.

fukushima-factsThe U.S. nuclear power industry did, in fact, have a good safety record.  Even after the partial nuclear reactor meltdown at Three Mile Island, Pennsylvania, in 1979, it was possible to say that no identifiable American had died as a result of nuclear power.

Then came the Chernobyl disaster of 1986 which made parts of Ukraine a toxic wasteland.  I attributed the tragedy to Communists not being able to manage a nuclear power plant competently.

Such a disaster would be highly improbable in a Western country, I thought.  And the last place I thought such a disaster could happen was Japan.  Not only were the Japanese known for being meticulous about good engineering practice, they were the only nation to have suffered nuclear bombing and would be especially nervous and careful about anything nuclear.

By the time of the Fukushima disaster of 2011, I had read Nassim Nicholas Taleb’s The Black Swan, and realized that the human tendency is to forget that the improbable is not impossible.  How likely was it it that a nuclear plant site would be hit simultaneously with an earthquake and a tidal wave?  Yet it happened.

Fukushima is an ongoing disaster that is much, much worse than anyone thought it could be.  Click on The REAL Fukushima Danger for a comprehensive roundup on Washington’s Blog to understand just how bad it is.

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